The iPad is an ideal tool for field archaeology.

This blog sets out to bring together experiences of archaeologists using iPads.

Friday, May 23, 2014

GIS technology verifies Caesar and Helvetii history

According to Caesar, more than a quarter of a million Helvetii were settled in the Swiss plateau before they decided to abandon their territory and invade Gaul in 58 BCE.


According to Caesar, more than a quarter of a million Helvetii were settled in the Swiss plateau before they decided to abandon their territory and invade Gaul in 58 BCE

AN INTERNATIONAL team is using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modelling to assess Julius Caesar’s account of his war with a Celtic tribe.
According to Caesar, more than a quarter of a million Helvetii were settled in the Swiss plateau before they decided to abandon their territory and invade Gaul in 58 BCE.
In his Gallic Wars he says the Helvitii were running out of food.
UWA archaeologist Tom Whitley is developing a GIS model to test Caesar’s population estimate and is testing geophysical techniques to see if they can detect signs of the migration and war.
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Mit dem Multicopter auf archäologischer Spurensuche

»Unmanned Aerial Vehicle« (UAV), hier ein Hexacopter, im Einsatz. 
Foto: AlejandroLinaresGarcia, CC-BY-SA

Der Einsatz von unbemannten Luftfahrzeugen, sogenannten Multicoptern, in Archäologie und Denkmalpflege ist Thema einer internationalen Tagung des Exzellenzclusters Topoi und des EU-Projekts "ArcheoLandscapes Europe", die derzeit an der Freien Universität Berlin stattfindet.

Teil des Expertentreffens ist eine öffentliche Flugvorführung im Thielpark in Berlin-Dahlem am Samstag, den 24. Mai von 10 bis 12 Uhr, bei der die verschiedenen Luftfahrzeuge im Einsatz zu erleben sind. Von 13 bis 15 Uhr können sich Interessierte außerdem über die Auswertung der aufgenommenen Landschaftsdaten in dreidimensionalen Modellen informieren.

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Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Scans bring new insights into lives of Egyptian mummies


Never before has anyone seen mummy hair, muscles and bone at such fine resolution.
It is enabling scientists for the first time to tell their age of the mummies, what they ate, the diseases they suffered from, and how they died.
Each mummy was put into a state-of-the-art CT scanner. Researchers probed them layer by layer to build up a high-definition 3D picture of each one. Once digitised, British Museum staff were then able to peel away each layer, to see the face of the person underneath the bandages.
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Sunday, May 4, 2014

A Point of View: Is the archaeological dig a thing of the past?


Archaeological discoveries are more likely to be found by technology than with a trowel and a torch, writes classical historian Mary Beard.
If you want a vivid glimpse of ancient Roman life, the best place to go - after the more famous Pompeii - is the town of Ostia, a 30-minute train ride from the centre of Rome, near the coast. It's one of my very favourite sites. Beautifully peaceful, surrounded by shady umbrella pines, and, quite unlike Pompeii, you often have it almost to yourself.
It wasn't so peaceful 2,000 years ago. From the end of the 1st Century AD, Ostia was one the two main ports of the city of Rome. It's where many of the supplies needed to keep the million or so inhabitants of the capital alive were hauled ashore. And it had then the seedy reputation that most big ports have even now. In the early 2nd Century, the satirist Juvenal (admittedly one of the grumpiest old men of the ancient world) bemoaned the kind of clientele you'd meet in an Ostian bar: "Thugs, thieves, runaway slaves, hangmen, coffin makers", and, not so common in a modern port, maybe, "eunuch priests".
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Thursday, May 1, 2014

Vikings Online Course


Vikings: Raiders, Traders and Settlers 

12 May to 25 July 2014


Vikings: Raiders, Traders and Settlers is an online archaeology course run by the University of Oxford's Department of Continuing Education.
The course runs for ten weeks and successful completion carries an award of ten CATS points. Students write two short assignments as part of the course.
Online forums for each unit enable students to discuss the topic being studied, and help from the online tutor is always available
You can find more details here...
You can find details of other online archaeology courses here...