The iPad is an ideal tool for field archaeology.

This blog sets out to bring together experiences of archaeologists using iPads.

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Explore 4,500 British Museum artifacts with Google's help


The British Museum in London holds an array of beautiful and historically significant artifacts including the Rosetta Stone, which helped historians to understand the ancient hieroglyphics used in Egypt. Today, the organisation is teaming up with Google to bring its various collections online as part of the Google Cultural Institute. The search giant has been developing this resource for years by continually visiting and archiving exhibits around the world. With the British Museum, an extra 4,500 objects and artworks are being added to its collection, complete with detailed photos and descriptions.
The most important addition is arguably the Admonitions Scroll, a Chinese text which dates back to the 6th-century. The piece is incredibly fragile, so it's only visible in the museum for a few months each year. Through the Cultural Institute, you can take a peek whenever you like -- and because it's been captured at "gigapixel" resolution you can zoom in to see some extraordinary details. All of the objects are searchable on Google's site, along with a couple of curated collections about ancient Egypt and Celtic life in the British Iron Age.
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Archaeologists uncover Roman roads from ancient Cyprus

Using photogrammetric technology, archaeologists imaged the surviving remains of Neo Paphos' ancient theatre

A team of Australian archaeologists has uncovered evidence of Roman roads and colonnades in Nea Paphos, Cyprus' ancient capital city.
A team of Australian archaeologists led by the University of Sydney’s Dr Craig Barker has uncovered evidence of Roman roads and colonnades in Nea Paphos, Cyprus’ capital city during the Hellenistic and Roman periods (c.300 BC-400 AD).
The University of Sydney team has been excavating at Nea Paphos for two decades under the auspices of Cyprus’ Department of Antiquities.  In that time it has uncovered and studied a theatre used for performance and spectacle for more than 600 years until its destruction in AD 365.
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Wednesday, November 11, 2015


CyArk is a non-profit organisation seeking to digitally preserve 500 of the world's most important heritage sites within five years.
Over 90 projects including the Brandenburg Gate in Germany and the Ziggurat of Ur in Iraq have already been completed.
The sites are 'recorded' using reality-capture technologies such as 3D laser scanning, photogrammetry and traditional survey.

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Friday, July 31, 2015

Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology


Information Policy for (Digital) Information in Archaeology: current state and suggestions for development

The introduction of digital data capturing and management technologies has transformed information practices in archaeology. Digital documentation and digital infrastructures are integrated in archaeologists' daily work now more than ever. International and national institutions and projects have contributed to the development of digital archiving and curation practices. Because knowledge production in archaeology depends heavily on documentation and information dissemination, and on retrieval of past documentation, the question of how information is managed is profoundly intertwined with the possibilities for knowledge production. Regulations at different levels articulate demands and expectations from the emerging digital information practices, but how are these different regulations coordinated, and do they support archaeological knowledge production?

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Sunday, July 12, 2015

Digital Reconstruction of Holt Castle


Robbed of stone to build Eaton Hall in C17, little today remains of the Edwardian castle of Holt a favourite of Richard II’s. Towards the end of his reign it became Richard’s royal treasury storing an estimated 100,000 marks (£66,000) just before his downfall.

Funded by the Castle Studies Trust, leading experts Rick Turner and Chris Jones-Jenkins have digitally reconstructed Holt in great detail both internally and externally which has been converted into a video fly-through to reveal what the castle was like at its zenith in the late C15

To see the video please go here:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wv_sHru_OG0 

This amazing work was done by combining their extensive knowledge and expertise with a variety of historical sources such as inventories, antiquarian drawings and plans as well as the results of recent excavations.

Project leader Rick Turner says:

“It has been great fun trying to solve the disappearance of this once famous castle. All the different pieces of evidence have had to be assessed and reconciled. The most important is what survives at the crime scene itself, the visible remains and what has been found in recent excavations. Old plan and views have been helpful in rebuilding the lost parts, though at times the information they give is contradictory. Visualizing what the documentary sources are describing has been a real challenge. We hope that we have done this impressive and complex castle justice.”

Castle Studies Trust Co-Patron John Goodall:

“This project has helped reconstruct in vivid detail the splendour of a major castle that has been lost for nearly four hundred years. The video fly-through will not only help people understand what this unusual and sophisticated building looked like, but also how it would have functioned as a working building, something that is impossible in its current condition.”

Watch the Video...

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past


“You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past” - A European competition to express your view.

What is archaeology? An adventure? A pain in the neck? The appeal of the past, the magic of marvellous sites, the boredom of a dusty museum? Probably all of these together, and still more.

Up until July 31st 2015, all European citizens can answer the question and tell us about their idea of archaeology by entering a drawing, painting, photo or video in the European competition “You(r) Archaeology”.

Further details...

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Remains of medieval knight discovered in UK Cathedral


The battered remains of a medieval man uncovered at a famous cathedral hint that he may have been a Norman knight with a proclivity for jousting. 


The skeleton of the medieval man, a possible knight, in his stone grave  [Credit: Headland Archaeology] The man may have participated in a form of jousting called tourney, in which men rode atop their horses and attacked one another, in large groups, with blunted weapons. 

Archaeologists uncovered the man's skeleton, along with about 2,500 others — including a person who had leprosy and a woman with a severed hand — buried at Hereford Cathedral in the United Kingdom. The cathedral was built in the 12th century and served as a place of worship and a burial ground in the following centuries, said Andy Boucher, a regional manager at Headland Archaeology, a commercial archaeology company that works with construction companies in the United Kingdom.

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Sunday, January 18, 2015

Mysterious medieval fortifications buried in Poland detected with advanced imaging technology


Archaeologists have discovered evidence of unknown medieval fortifications which may indicate the presence of Hussite clashes near a small village in Poland.
Discovered buried in wooded foothills near the village of Bie┼║dziadka in south-eastern Poland, the site was examined by archaeologists Joanna Pilszyk and Piotr Szmyd. Based on the report fromScience and Scholarship in Poland (PAP), the fortifications were discovered underground using sophisticated laser detection and aerial mapping.
The fort is to have sat on top of a plateau with steep sides, the sheer slope and height of over two meters (6.5 feet) naturally protecting the stronghold. Moats were believed to surround the site, and high fences or palisades are likely to have run along the perimeter. The age of the fort is not known, but researchers say it was probably built during the Middle Ages.
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